Skip links

Twin or Multiple Pregnancy

These are more frequent and are the result of two separate eggs being fertilised at the same time. This means each baby will have its own placenta, and its own amniotic sac. This means a lower risk for the babies during the pregnancy, but they will require more monitoring than a single pregnancy. 

Non Identical Twins

These are more frequent and are the result of two separate eggs being fertilised at the same time. This means each baby will have its own placenta, and its own amniotic sac. This means a lower risk for the babies during the pregnancy, but they will require more monitoring than a single pregnancy. 

Despite being non-identical, these twins can look very similar to each other. They can also be quite different. They can have the same gender, or you might have one of each.

Identical Twins

The result of one embryo splitting in the days after being fertilised. Because they share the same egg and sperm, and the same DNA, most identical twins look almost exactly the same. But, given the influence of environment, it is worth noting that identical twins can look slightly different. 

Depending on how late the single embryo splits the two babies can share a single placenta, a single sac, or even share some of the bodies development (conjoined).

This can bring higher health risks for the baby and the mother. Guy will be able to help you understand what those risks might be, for you, and help you go into the pregnancy with the knowledge you need to be as confident as possible about the pregnancy.

Triplets, Quadruplets, Quintuplets And More

About one in a thousand pregnancies will be triplets. The chances are even rarer for higher order multiple pregnancies. And these may come from one egg cleaving several times, or multiple eggs being fertilised at the same time (as with IVF) or a mixture of both.

As with twins, there are increased risks involved with multiple pregnancies but, with appropriate monitoring and the right information, you can go into the experience with a relatively high degree of confidence.

FAQ’s

Multiple pregnancies (twins, triplets, quadruplets and quintuplets) make up 2-3% of all births.

Most multiple pregnancies are twins.

There are two ways multiple births occur.

They are created by multiple ovulation – when more than one egg is released during ovulation, and those eggs are fertilised. This will result in non-identical siblings.

Multiple births can also occur due to an early embryo cleavage or split. This results in identical siblings.

There are many issues that increase the risks to you and your babies during a multiple pregnancy. 

These are due to the extra stress placed on your body, having to carry and sustain more than one baby, and the babies’ bodies, having to share the same space.

Risks can include an increased health risk for you, including issues like gestational diabetes and anaemia, and a higher chance of earlier than usual delivery.

If you are having a multiple birth, your obstetrician will want to see you more regularly and will help you manage and understand what you can expect during your pregnancy.

Yes.  You will be required to see Dr Skinner more frequently as you will need closer monitoring. This is to ensure the ongoing health of you and your babies.

Most likely, yes. You will very possibly need to deliver your babies early. In most cases, the time frame is approximately 37 weeks or less. If you are having quadruplets or quintuplets, this timeframe can be even shorter. 

Guy is a highly trained obstetrician with over 20years’ experience in helping mothers successfully through a multiple birth and will be able to explain what you should most probably experience – and how you can help ensure the delivery of healthy babies.