An Accredited Obstetrician in Melbourne You Can Trust

Choosing an obstetrician in Melbourne that you can trust to assist you in the delivery of your baby is key to ensuring a safe and happy pregnancy and birth. This is never an easy decision and one that we understand is critical to you and your family. Dr Guy Skinner is the perfect choice when it comes to professionalism, knowledge and expertise, as he is a leader in the industry.

Dr Guy Skinner is a specialist, accredited, private obstetrician (Ob) and gynaecologist, having delivered and cared for more than 10,000 babies across Melbourne and overseas. His widespread knowledge of the obstetric field is expansive and his dedication to providing quality medical care is unwaivering. With an interest in research and education, Dr Guy Skinner continues to lecture and tutor obstetric trainees from the RANZCOG, medical students and midwives.

MATERNITY ONE

This program is sometimes the best option for first time mothers, and is recommended for ‘high risk’ pregnancy, have health concerns, or have had complicated pregnancies in the past.

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MATERNITY PLUS

This program is mostly suited to patients who have previously had uncomplicated pregnancies and are’low risk’ or first time mothers who choose this option.

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Dr Guy Skinner – Melbourne Obstetrician and Gynaecologist

Obstetric specialities

Dr Guy Skinner’s specialities over his years of practice are in twins, breech delivery, high risk pregnancy and laparoscopic surgery. He has a passion and enjoyment for his profession that sees him strive to provide the best possible care for both mother and baby. He cares deeply about all his patients and does everything within his power to make sure they have a positive experience.
His rooms are based on site at St Vincent’s Private Hospital, Fitzroy enabling greater and more ready access to speciality resources and professional medical care available to his patients. A professional and expert in his field, Dr Guy Skinner will make sure you are fully prepared with all pre-pregnancy planning and provide you with everything you need prior to giving birth. His wealth of obstetrician experience and knowledge will aim to ensure the birth process runs smoothly and that you are provided with the highest quality care.

Get in touch today

To find out more about Dr Guy Skinner, our fees or to make an appointment today, call us on (03) 9417 0147. Our office hours are Monday – Friday, 9am – 5pm.

Contact us with any queries you may have, our friendly staff are always happy to help. We look forward to hearing from you soon.

ABOUT GUY

Guy is a private obstetrician and gynaecologist working in Melbourne. His rooms are based onsite at St Vincent’s Private Hospital, Fitzroy enabling greater and more ready access to speciality resources and to the best professional medical care available to his patients. Guy delivers privately at both St Vincent’s and Freemasons Hospitals’.

OUR SERVICES

pre-pregnancy
pregnancy
gynaecology

GET IN TOUCH WITH US TODAY!

WHERE ARE WE LOCATED?

ST VINCENT’S PRIVATE HOSPITAL
Suite 3, Level 1 59-61 Victoria parade Fitzroy VIC 3065

4 days ago

Dr Guy Skinner

A gorgeous photo to end the week! Baby Jaxon how cute you are........ ... See MoreSee Less

A gorgeous photo to end the week! Baby Jaxon how cute you are........

 

Comment on Facebook

Thank you again to Dr guy skinner and his lovely team 💙 you guys have been amazing once again 😊

4 days ago

Dr Guy Skinner

Caesarean Births Linked to Developmental Delay.

A recent study reviewing nearly 5000 children being followed in the longitudinal study of Australian children (LSAC) reported a small but significant reduction in the performance in NAPLAN (National Educational Standardised Assessments) by children delivered at birth by caesarean section. This finding was consistent after removing possible confounding factors such as prematurity, fetal distress, admission to special care nursery and sociodemographic factors.

It is a consistent finding that demands further research before a true association can be confirmed. It was reported as not a large difference (equivalent to 6 weeks behind in schooling) but consistent across all subgroups measured. It could not be explained by lower breast feeding rates or other adverse child and maternal health outcomes in the caesarean born children.
Other associations with caesarean born children include increased rates of asthma, allergies, childhood obesity, gut infections and type 1 diabetes mellitis.

There is significant research now demonstrating different skin and gut flora (microbiome) in caesarean born children that have not been in labour prior to delivery. This different flora might be partially responsible for the difference in the bodies responses to dealing with new environmental challenges. The gut is recognised as a mediator of immune response to the environment.

Pre-caesarean vaginal swabbing used to collect the flora that a baby would normally be exposed to during birth and then voluntarily transferring it to the caesarean born baby immediately after birth is referred to as 'Vaginal Seeding'. We have developed a policy in relation to this selected practice at St Vincent's Private Hospital Melbourne if parents wish to do this. Its purpose is to help reduce the possibility of the baby being inadvertently infected with a potentially dangerous pathogen. You are welcome to discuss this with us during the pregnancy if you are interested. The potential benefits of this practice have not been proven adequately in research to date, but much research is currently underway.
... See MoreSee Less

Caesarean Births Linked to Developmental Delay.

A recent study reviewing nearly 5000 children being followed in the longitudinal study of Australian children (LSAC) reported a small but significant reduction in the performance in NAPLAN (National Educational Standardised Assessments) by children delivered at birth by caesarean section. This finding was consistent after removing possible confounding factors such as prematurity, fetal distress, admission to special care nursery and sociodemographic factors.

It is a consistent finding that demands further research before a true association can be confirmed. It was reported as not a large difference (equivalent to 6 weeks behind in schooling) but consistent across all subgroups measured. It could not be explained by lower breast feeding rates or other adverse child and maternal health outcomes in the caesarean born children.
Other associations with caesarean born children include increased rates of asthma, allergies, childhood obesity, gut infections and type 1 diabetes mellitis.

There is significant research now demonstrating different skin and gut flora (microbiome) in caesarean born children that have not been in labour prior to delivery. This different flora might be partially responsible for the difference in the bodies responses to dealing with new environmental challenges. The gut is recognised as a mediator of immune response to the environment.
 
Pre-caesarean vaginal swabbing used to collect the flora that a baby would normally be exposed to during birth and then voluntarily transferring it to the caesarean born baby immediately after birth is referred to as Vaginal Seeding. We have developed a policy in relation to this selected practice at St Vincents Private Hospital Melbourne if parents wish to do this. Its purpose is to help reduce the possibility of the baby being inadvertently infected with a potentially dangerous pathogen. You are welcome to discuss this with us during the pregnancy if you are interested. The potential benefits of this practice have not been proven adequately in research to date, but much research is currently underway.

 

Comment on Facebook

Michelle

ND Bee

Very interesting post Dr Skinner.

I wish i was offered vaginal seeding

Leading the way. Well done. Great to see a picture of yours kids xx

Gorgeous kids Guy.

Bullshitc

Loui Papas

Angela Notarfrancesco

Gorgeous children Guy.

Tristan Fairbairn

+ View more comments

2 weeks ago

Dr Guy Skinner

Baby Noa with her big sister Elu. Noa has been giving everyone smiles except the camera! Beautiful girls Sarah and Chuck. Congratulations. ... See MoreSee Less

Baby Noa with her big sister Elu. Noa has been giving everyone smiles except the camera! Beautiful girls Sarah and Chuck. Congratulations.

3 weeks ago

Dr Guy Skinner

We are currently experiencing one of the worst flu outbreaks on record!

Getting the flu can cause serious problems when you are pregnant. Even if you are generally healthy, changes in immune, heart, and lung functions during pregnancy make you more likely to get severely ill from the flu.

What is the flu (influenza)?

Influenza, or flu, is a highly contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses. The influenza virus is mainly spread from person to person through droplets when an infected person coughs or sneezes, or through touching contaminating surfaces.
While the symptoms can be mild in young adults, if the infection is spread to a pregnant woman or a newborn baby it can be life-threatening.

The flu shot is the best protection for you and your baby.

You can get the flu shot (vaccine) at any time during your pregnancy. Some of the antibodies that your body makes in response to the vaccine pass onto your baby during your pregnancy. These antibodies will help protect your baby from flu in the crucial first few months of life. When you breastfeed your baby, antibodies may also be passed through the breast milk.
It takes at least two weeks to make antibodies after getting a flu vaccine and for pregnant women it might be up to four weeks.

The flu shot is safe for pregnant women and their babies?

Yes, the vaccine is safe for both you and your baby when given during pregnancy. There is no evidence of an increased risk of problems for mothers or their babies when the mother is given a flu shot during pregnancy.
The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RANZCOG) strongly recommends influenza vaccination for pregnant women to protect both the mother and the baby.

How do I get a free flu shot?

Talk to your GP today about getting free flu shot. While it is recommended that all pregnant women should be vaccinated as early as possible in pregnancy, the precise timing of vaccination will depend on the time of year and vaccine availability.
... See MoreSee Less

We are currently experiencing one of the worst flu outbreaks on record!

Getting the flu can cause serious problems when you are pregnant. Even if you are generally healthy, changes in immune, heart, and lung functions during pregnancy make you more likely to get severely ill from the flu. 

What is the flu (influenza)? 

Influenza, or flu, is a highly contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses. The influenza virus is mainly spread from person to person through droplets when an infected person coughs or sneezes, or through touching contaminating surfaces. 
While the symptoms can be mild in young adults, if the infection is spread to a pregnant woman or a newborn baby it can be life-threatening. 

The flu shot is the best protection for you and your baby.

You can get the flu shot (vaccine) at any time during your pregnancy. Some of the antibodies that your body makes in response to the vaccine pass onto your baby during your pregnancy. These antibodies will help protect your baby from flu in the crucial first few months of life. When you breastfeed your baby, antibodies may also be passed through the breast milk. 
It takes at least two weeks to make antibodies after getting a flu vaccine and for pregnant women it might be up to four weeks. 

The flu shot is safe for pregnant women and their babies? 

Yes, the vaccine is safe for both you and your baby when given during pregnancy. There is no evidence of an increased risk of problems for mothers or their babies when the mother is given a flu shot during pregnancy. 
The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RANZCOG) strongly recommends influenza vaccination for pregnant women to protect both the mother and the baby. 

How do I get a free flu shot? 

Talk to your GP today about getting free flu shot. While it is recommended that all pregnant women should be vaccinated as early as possible in pregnancy, the precise timing of vaccination will depend on the time of year and vaccine availability.

 

Comment on Facebook

Elisha Ferguson

1 month ago

Dr Guy Skinner

Baby Georgia sleeping peacefully. Congratulations Merrily and Chris! ... See MoreSee Less

Baby Georgia sleeping peacefully. Congratulations Merrily and Chris!
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